The Trinity (part 1)

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Systematic TheologyThis week we discussed how the Trinity is a unique doctrine that distinguishes Christianity from all other religions. While many religions are unitarian, believing there is person who is God, Christian orthodoxy teaches that there are three Persons who are God. Christianity is therefore a trinitarian religion. We discussed the importance of this unique doctrine, provide the biblical basis for it, and then evaluated some models for understanding the ontology of the Trinity.

 


The Love of God

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Systematic TheologyThis week we discussed God’s love. We saw that the love of God is unconditional and eternal; love is an essential constituent of His being and therefore, God’s love extends to the whole world (though it is only those who believe who become beneficiaries of that love). We also saw that, far from being simply and emotion, love involves action. The preeminent example of love, of course, is the gospel message itself; God’s love for the world manifested itself in the Incarnation and atonement of the Son (John 3:16).

 


The Omnipotence of God

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Systematic TheologyThis week we discussed the fact that God is all-powerful. There is nothing God cannot accomplish. This however, must be qualified for while is true that God is all-powerful, it is also true that He cannot act contrary to His own nature (i.e. He cannot lie) or actualize a contradictory state of affairs (create a married bachelor). Thus, God’s omnipotence means that He can do all things that are contrary to His own nature, and that are logically possible.